National Govt Wanting To Ignore Research on Porn Harm

Media Release 5 March 2017
Family First NZ says that the National-led Government is unwilling to confront the growing evidence about the public health and societal harms of pornography, despite growing concerns from social scientists, psychologists, counsellors, and parents.

National has told 1 News that they’re not considering the issue despite a petition to be presented calling for an expert panel to investigate the research. In contrast, Labour, Greens and ACT have supported the concept in principle, with NZ First and the Maori party still to consider their position.

“There are two major issues that our country must confront sooner than later. The first is the link between the regular and increasing consumption of online pornography and our unacceptable rates of sexual violence. The second, which many parents are very concerned about, is the effect of pornography viewing on younger people and its easy availability – even when children are not actively seeking it,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ.

“Research shows that men who view pornography regularly have a higher tolerance for abnormal sexuality, including rape, sexual aggression, and sexual promiscuity. A 2010 meta-analysis of several studies found “an overall significant positive association between pornography use and attitudes supporting violence against women.” The research also is discovering the highly addictive nature of pornography – termed by some as ‘the new drug’.”

“Research has also shown that children who are exposed to pornography develop skewed ideas about sex and sexuality, which lead to negative stereotypes of women, sexual activity at a young age, and increased aggression in boys. It also places unacceptable pressure on young girls which leads to eating disorders, body dissatisfaction, low self-esteem, depression, and other harms,” says Mr McCoskrie.

The petition states: “That an expert panel be appointed to investigate the public health effects and societal harms of pornography to both children and adults, and to make policy recommendations to Parliament.”
The website is www.porninquiry.nz

Early last year, the deputy chief censor called for the government to put more options on the table for regulating online pornography, saying “Given New Zealand’s acknowledged problems with sexual and family violence and the demonstrated harm caused by pornography that degrades, dehumanises and demeans people (particularly women), the choice for Government and regulators, must be about how far we are willing to intervene — rather than whether we are prepared to intervene at all.

These studies all highlight the extent to which porn is not a private matter to be ignored by the government. It is a public health crisis which needs to be confronted,” says Mr McCoskrie.

“If we want to tackle sexual violence, we must first admit the role that pornography plays and the harm that it does to attitudes and actions.”

YOUTUBE presentationhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjmg4IiPCUk

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