Kiwis divided on paid ‘father leave’ for dads of newborns

TVNZ One News 17 March 2016
Family First Comment: That’s ok. But the best thing is that there is now a discussion about the role of fathers, the need for fathers, and the desire for hands-on parenting by dads. And that’s a great discussion to be had!

New Zealanders are split on Family First’s call for fathers of newborn babies to get at least two weeks paid parental leave, judging by reaction to the idea on social media.

“Yes yes yes, both parents deserve to spend that first weeks with their NB baby. Father should be treated the same way as mothers, totally agree,” SIarai Luafale T Wily wrote on the ONE News Facebook page where the story has reached more than 109,000 people and attracted well over 300 comments.

Family First, which promotes traditional family values, has submitted the proposal to a Parliamentary committee considering a parental leave amendment bill.

The organisation supported extending paid parental leave to 26 weeks, and wanted paid “father leave” for at least two weeks, rising to four weeks.

Currently new Kiwi dads are allowed two weeks of unpaid leave, and Family First National director Bob McCoskrie says having paid leave will promote hands-on parenting by fathers.
READ MORE: https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/kiwis-divided-paid-father-leave-dads-newborns

‘Family First’ Are Fighting For Paid ‘Paternal Leave’
The Hits 17 March 2016
Fathers to newborns should get two weeks’ paid “father leave” to help them bond with their baby and support their partner through an often stressful time, Family First NZ say.

In 2011 Australia introduced a “Dad and Partner” pay scheme, that provides two weeks’ leave for most working fathers after the birth of a child, with a payment equivalent of the minimum wage.

The support is to help fathers bond with their child, take on more care, and help out mothers following a birth.

Family First NZ submitted today to a Parliamentary committee considering a parental leave amendment bill and, while supporting an extension of paid parental leave to 26 weeks, also asked for paid father leave of two weeks rising to four weeks.

National director Bob McCoskrie said its own polling carried out by Curia Market Research showed 68 per cent of New Zealanders backed paid father leave.

“The period immediately following the birth of a child is demanding and difficult for mums, especially with sleep deprivation, recovering from childbirth, and coping with the existing demands of siblings,” Mr McCoskrie said.

At present, dads are entitled to two weeks’ unpaid leave. The primary eligibility for paid parental leave lies with the mother. If her partner is also eligible then she may transfer all or part of her entitlement to her partner.
http://www.thehits.co.nz/breaking-news/family-first-are-fighting-for-paid-paternal-leave/

Committee considers paid leave for fathers
The Aucklander 17 March 2016
Fathers of newborns should get two weeks paid “father leave” to help them bond with their baby and support their partner through an often stressful time, Family First NZ say.

A number of countries have varying paid leave for new dads.

In 2011 Australia introduced a “Dad and Partner” pay scheme, that provides two weeks leave for most working fathers after the birth of a child, with a payment equivalent of the minimum wage.

The support is to help fathers bond with their child, take on more care, and help out mothers following a birth.

Family First NZ yesterday submitted to a Parliamentary committee considering a parental leave amendment bill and, while supporting an extension of paid parental leave to 26 weeks, also asked for paid father leave of two weeks rising to four weeks.

National director Bob McCoskrie said its own polling carried out by Curia Market Research showed 68 per cent of New Zealanders backed paid father leave.

“The period immediately following the birth of a child is demanding and difficult for mums, especially with sleep deprivation, recovering from childbirth, and coping with the existing demands of siblings,” Mr McCoskrie said. “This will promote hands-on parenting by fathers, which is a good thing.”
READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/aucklander/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503378&objectid=11607013

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