Vigilante Action Against Residential Brothels Expected

Media Release 24 September 2013
Family First NZ is commending actions by a Christchurch City Council candidate to get a residential brothel out of his street, and is predicting that there will be more ‘vigilante justice’ against street prostitution and residential-based brothels as communities around the country become victims of a flawed law change.

“Brothels – no matter how large or small – simply shouldn’t be in residential areas or near sensitive sites such as schools, churches or maraes,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ. “Before decriminalisation, the prostitution industry was predominantly a red-light district issue. Since decriminalisation, the industry has moved right next door to a family home and opposite a school or kindy.”

“We are being regularly contacted by families around the country who are opposed to brothels opening next door to family homes, and within a short distance of sensitive sites such as schools, playgrounds, and playcentres.”

“Accounts of home brothels (SOOB’s) where men willing to pay for sex are visiting nearby homes trying to find the brothel, and concerns about noise, traffic, intimidation, and late-night visits are common experiences from having a brothel in a residential street or next to a school,” says Mr McCoskrie.

In a poll of 1,000 people undertaken by Curia Market Research in 2011, 66% wanted brothels banned in residential areas, 26% disagreed, and the remainder (8%) were either unsure or refused to answer. More women than men wanted the ban.

“Street prostitution also continues to plague communities highlighted by retailers and families in Manurewa being affected by the activities of prostitution, including half-naked prostitutes, used condoms, propositioning of family members, intimidation, noise and nuisance, and a general reduced sense of safety.”

“The fallout from the naïve decriminalisation of prostitution has affected both residential areas and family shopping areas and the local councils have been powerless to act,” says Mr McCoskrie.

“The decriminalisation of prostitution has been a community disaster harming families, businesses, and the welfare of workers caught in the industry. Cities throughout NZ have been trying to deal with the ‘hospital pass’ given by the politicians when they passed this law. It’s time they fixed the law.”

Family First is encouraging residents to continue their battles against residential brothels and street prostitution and to continue to tell politicians that they must listen to the concerns of local communities.
ENDS