First Anti-Smacking, Now Anti-Time Out

Family First NZ says that ‘time out’ is now being targeted as the new taboo of parenting by anti-smacking groups.

The comments come after psychologist Nigel Latta was lambasted by supporters of the anti-smacking law when he suggested that parents may need to lock the room to prevent a child coming out of ‘time out’ in their bedroom.

“Sue Bradford suggested it could damage the children psychologically and Barnardos said parents should call a help-line instead,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ. “They seem to be completely out of touch with the realities of parenting, Nigel Latta’s down-to-earth but politically-incorrect advice, and the context in which he made the statements.”

“Other so-called parenting experts have previously claimed that time out is shameful and humiliating and creates hurt, anger and defiance in a child. They also claim that nervous habits can result, and that children should not be told they are naughty,”

“Also of concern is the NZ Law Society representative’s comments to the Sunday Star Times. To intimate that the use of force to deal with defiant or unacceptable behaviour is problematic, is completely devoid of the realities of parenting. Many parents have to use a level of force to enforce compliance by a child, and may even need to take action to prevent children running away or not doing as they are asked.”

“Once again, these ‘perfect parenting’ demands and latest fads in parenting by so-called experts simply undermine the confidence of parents to raise their children in a positive and common sense way. Will it soon be unacceptable to withdraw privileges or ‘ground’ a child – perhaps even unacceptable to frown at a child who is misbehaving!”

“Great and law-abiding kiwi parents are being forced to change their parenting techniques based on flawed and unproven ideology and scaremongering of academics, politicians and state agencies who have misdefined positive parenting and child abuse.”
ENDS