Over 45 pro-family groups to gather for NZ Forum on the Family

More than 45 family-focused organisations plus researchers and scholars are gathering in Auckland tomorrow for the inaugural New Zealand Forum on the Family, hosted by Family First.

Key speakers include Ian Grant from Parents Inc, Christine Rankin from For the Sake of the Children Trust, and Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First. Sessions include ‘Working with the Media’ presented by Ian Wishart of Investigate Magazine, and ‘The Australian Experience’ presented by David Yates, Chief of Staff of the Australian Christian Lobby.

“The purpose of the day is to bring a number of pro-family organisations together to synergise,” says forum spokesman Bob McCoskrie. “There are many pro-family groups who, along with their thousands of members, are concerned about the breakdown of the family, the denial of the huge benefits to society of marriage, and a society which is counter-cultural to family values. This forum will enable these groups to work together and to speak up for these issues more effectively.”

The 100 Conference delegates will also discuss and endorse two statements of belief regarding the definition and principles of both marriage and family.

“Political correctness has strangled the ability to tell the truth about these matters,” says McCoskrie. “These statements will highlight the principles to which society needs to return, in order to stop the breakdown of family and community values, and to stop the increase in crime, poverty and dysfunction.”

The principles to be endorsed affirm that the family, not the individual, is the fundamental social unit and cannot be redefined by social engineering. The clear empirical evidence is that the best environment in which to raise children is the natural two-parent, husband-wife family, and that the task of government is to shelter and encourage the natural family.

The statement on marriage defines it as being between a man and a woman and acknowledges that marriage protects children and promotes their wellbeing. When marriage weakens, children suffer in numerous ways from the disadvantages of growing up in homes without committed mothers and fathers.
ENDS